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Posts for: February, 2022

By Pacific Pediatrics Medical Group, Inc
February 16, 2022
Category: Safety and Health
Tags: COVID Vaccine  
FAQs About the Pediatric COVID VaccineNo doubt you’ve been hearing a lot of discussions, particularly on the news, about the Covid-19 vaccine. You’ve also heard that kids five years old and older are now eligible to get the vaccine. Of course, any pediatrician understands that parents may have questions or concerns about this new vaccine and whether it’s right for their child. Here are the top questions about the Covid-19 vaccine and children.

Is the Covid-19 vaccine safe for children?

Yes, the Covid-19 vaccine is safe for kids 5 years old and older. The vaccine has undergone the same testing, clinical trials, and authorization that the Covid-19 vaccine has for adults. While it is normal to experience mild side effects such as soreness at the injection site or fatigue, these are signs that the body is building up protection. While some kids may experience side effects, not all kids will.

What is in the Covid-19 vaccine?

There is a blend of active and inactive ingredients within the vaccines and each manufacturer has published a list of their vaccine’s ingredients online. All vaccines are free from metals and manufactured products such as carbon nanotubes. Vaccines do not contain eggs, latex, preservatives, or gelatin. Each manufacturer offers its list of ingredients that you can check out: Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson.

How many doses of the Covid-19 vaccine does my child need?

Pfizer is the only vaccine that is currently approved for use in children ages 5 years to 17 years old. Teens 18 years old and older can choose from Pfizer, Moderna, or the J&J vaccine. Both Pfizer and Moderna require two doses administered at least three weeks apart, while the Johnson & Johnson vaccine only requires a single dose.

Can my child get the booster shot?

It’s is recommended that everyone get the booster shot about 6 months after getting the Pfizer vaccine. Teens 16-17 years old and older are eligible for the booster shot and should get one. Talk to your pediatrician to find out if it’s time for your child’s booster.

If you need to schedule a Covid-19 vaccine for your child or teen, call your pediatrician today to book your child’s appointment. If you have additional questions about the vaccine, don’t hesitate to call your child’s doctor.

By Pacific Pediatrics Medical Group, Inc
February 01, 2022
Category: Safety and Health
Tags: Chickenpox  
ChickenpoxThe infamous chickenpox, a virus known to cause itchy blisters all over the body. It most often happens to school-age kids, but unfortunately, if you’ve never had this infection as a kid you could get it as an adult. There is a chickenpox vaccine that children should get from their pediatrician. The first dose is administered between 12-15 months old and the second and final dose is given between 4-6 years old. While the vaccine is designed to protect kids against the virus, sometimes children can still get a milder form.

What are the signs and symptoms of chickenpox?

Chickenpox is notorious for causing fluid-filled and intensely itchy blisters on the body. Chickenpox blisters typically appear about 10 to 21 days after being exposed to the virus, and symptoms can last up to 10 days. In the beginning, your child may only show symptoms of a cold including loss of appetite, fatigue, fever, headache, and overall malaise. They may also experience a stomachache or sore throat. These symptoms will often appear before the rash.

The rash often starts on the face or stomach and then spreads throughout the rest of the body. Once the blisters break open, they will crust over and eventually fall off. It’s important that kids do not scratch these blisters, as this can lead to infections and scarring.

Is there a way to treat chickenpox?

Since chickenpox is caused by a virus, antibiotics will not be effective at treating this infection. Most treatment options are aimed at providing relief from symptoms while the body gets rid of the infection. If your child is at risk for complications related to chickenpox, their pediatrician may prescribe antiviral medication. Simple home care can help to alleviate discomfort due to chickenpox. This includes taking oatmeal baths and applying cold compresses to the blisters.

Is chickenpox preventable?

Absolutely. There is a chickenpox vaccine that all kids can and should get from their pediatrician. Even if kids still end up getting chickenpox after getting the vaccine, their symptoms will be much milder. If your child has already had chickenpox then they do not need to get vaccinated as they already have lifelong immunity.

If you have questions or concerns about chickenpox, or whether your child should get vaccinated, don’t hesitate to call your child’s pediatrician to learn more.